Adolescent health undervalued in developing countries
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Adolescent health undervalued in developing countries

Youth Health: The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute examined how many international donors spent on youth health projects in 132 low-income countries in the 14 years between 2003 and 2015.

 

A recent study has shown that youth health programs around the world receive only a small portion of international assistance, although young people in low-income countries account for 30% of the population.

 

The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne looked at how many international donors in 132 low-income countries spent on youth health projects in the 14 years between 2003 and 2015.

 

Research has shown that only 1.6% of health investment in these 13 years was spent on projects for adolescents, although adolescents in developing countries make up 12% to 13% of the burden of disease development.

 

Co-author Prof. George Patton, Center for Youth Health at GTRC said: “From what I have invested little, most of the funds are indirectly channeled through HIV programs to adolescents, especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

 

However, many young people in low-income countries are disabled due to depression, self-harm, and car accidents. “

 

Professor Patton said that these youth challenges were unlikely to attract investment. The neglected spending on health and mental car accidents, however, should bring huge benefits to teenage regions: their future health, productivity, and quality of life, healthy growth for their children.

 

She also said that despite the support of the United Nations Global Strategy for Women, Children, and Youth, international investment in the global economy has so far been scarce.

 

The lead author of the study, Chunling Lu, said, “Given the importance of young people for the future of well-being and economic development in low- and middle-income countries, international donors should reconsider the levels and investment patterns that do.”

 

He said the world today has the largest group of teenagers in human history. The study appears in the journal “JAMA Network Open.”

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