Multivitamins, mineral supplements may not prevent cardiovascular diseases
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Multivitamins, mineral supplements may not prevent cardiovascular diseases

The study, published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, found no link between multivitamin and mineral supplementation and a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

 

If you are taking multivitamin and mineral supplements to protect your heart’s health, think again. A new analysis of 18 studies has shown that heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death are not prevented. The study, published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, found no link between multivitamin and mineral supplementation and a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

 

“We meticulously evaluated all scientific evidence and found no clinical benefit from the use of multivitamins and minerals to prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular deaths,” said Joonseok Kim, Professor Assistant at the University of Alabama in Birmingham.

 

According to the researchers, the American Heart Association does not recommend the use of multivitamin or mineral supplements to prevent cardiovascular disease. The controversy over the efficacy of multivitamin and mineral supplements in the prevention of cardiovascular disease has been going on for years, although many well-conducted research studies indicate they are not helping.

 

Researchers have committed to combining the results of previously published scientific studies to clarify the problem. For the study, the research team conducted a “meta-analysis” that collected the results of 18 individual studies with 2019862 participants and an average follow-up of 12 years.

 

These included prospective clinical studies and cohort studies in the general population, which examined the links between multivitamin/mineral supplements and cardiovascular disease outcomes.

 

“Although moderate multivitamin and mineral supplements rarely cause direct damage, we encourage people to protect their heart health by understanding their individual risk of heart disease and strokes and working with a caregiver – proven measures to reduce the risk,” Kim said.

 

“They include a heart-healthy diet, exercise, smoking cessation, blood pressure control and unhealthy cholesterol and, if necessary, medical treatment,” Kim said.

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