‘Sex addiction’ classified as a mental health disorder by WHO
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‘Sex addiction’ classified as a mental health disorder by WHO

The World Health Organization (WHO) has now included in its new issue of the International Classification of Diseases, ICD-11, “compulsive sexual behavior, commonly known as sex addiction,” as a mental illness. The WHO list defines the problem of sexually coercive behavior as a “persistent pattern of failure in controlling the intense and repetitive sexual impulses or impulses that result from repetitive sexual behavior.”

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) has for the first time classified sexual behavior, commonly known as sex addiction, as a mental disorder. The inclusion of sexual behavior in the WHO classification of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) occurs several weeks after the addiction to gambling. The list, called ICD-11, is the basis for doctors and health statistics. Map human conditions such as health problems, injuries, and causes of death, etc.

 

The WHO list, which was updated in June, defines the problem of sexually coercive behavior as a “persistent pattern of lack of control over intense repetitive sexual impulses or impulses leading to repeated sexual behavior”. Symptoms of sexually compulsive behavior may be that sex becomes the “central focus” of a person’s life, regardless of health, care or personal interests and responsibilities. This means that the disorder can interfere with a person’s ability to go to work or finish school.

 

“Between 2 and 4% of the UK population suffer from compulsive sexual behavior.” In the United States, an estimated 3 to 6 percent of adults are affected, “said Dr. Valerie Voon of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, cited by the New York Post.

 

By definition, the person experiencing this sexual behavior had to cope with a longer period of about six months or more. According to the WHO, patients have to experience significant distress because of their dependence before being diagnosed.

 

The last DIC should be presented to all WHO Member States at their annual meeting in May 2019.

 

However, many experts do not agree with the WHO classification and argue that this behavior is a true diagnosis.

 

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