The study predicts long-term outcome of boys with ADHD
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The study predicts long-term outcome of boys with ADHD

The study found that childhood behavioral problems were negatively related to the overall functioning of adults, school performance and work.

A recent study was conducted to predict the long-term outcome of children with attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The researchers concluded that early intervention in children with normal but low IQ could be considered. Published research on a group of children with ADHD diagnosed in childhood (if they were on average over 8 years old) and adulthood (when they were around 40 years old).

 

The aim was to investigate whether the characteristics of children in childhood and adolescence predicted their academic achievement, work and social adaptation.

 

Research shows that children with ADHD have lower educational attainment, less social functioning and less successful work than their peers without ADHD. Being able to identify leading indicators of future success in life is important for informing about preventive and therapeutic practices, “said lead author Maria Ramos-Olazagasti University of Columbia.

 

The Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital study program at the NYU Langone Medical Center focused on a cohort of 207 white, middle, and lower children between the ages of 6 and 12, who were referred to a psychiatric clinic because of their problems from their school.

 

Children in the study who must have an IQ of at least 85 had symptoms consistent with the DSM-5 definition of ADHD. The children participated in three follow-up interviews at the age of 18 years, in adulthood at the age of 25 years and in middle-aged adults at the age of 41 years.

 

At each stage, the study evaluated the social and professional skills of the participants, their overall adaptation and their educational attainment.

 

Most early features did not differentiate between bad and positive results. There were two potentially important exceptions. On the one hand, higher IQ levels were associated with a better function in several areas. In addition, the study found that childhood behavioral problems were negatively related to the overall functioning of adults, school performance, and occupational activity.

 

Therefore, the results show that even mild behavioral problems can predict relatively weak academic, professional, and general outcomes later in life. Interestingly, the authors found that children who had concrete education goals for their future as teenagers are generally better off than adults.

 

These results suggest that we should not even neglect the behavior of relatively small problems in children with ADHD, and those early interventions for children with normal but low IQ could be considered, “said Dr. Ramos-Olazagasti.

 

These results also seem promising, showing the importance of setting goals and justifying the attitude of young people towards their future.

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